IFPI Forces Danish ISP to Block The Pirate Bay Ernesto The battle between the IFPI and the Pirate Bay continues. A Danish court ruled in favor of the IFPI, and ordered the Danish ISP "Tele2?$B!m (DMT2-Tele2) to block all access to the popular BitTorrent tracker. The Pirate Bay, currently ranked 28th in the list of most visited sites in Denmark, is working on countermeasures. The court case was initiated by the IFPI - the infamous anti-piracy organization that represents the recording industry - and plans to force other ISPs to do the same. However, The Pirate Bay is determined to fight back, as usual. The Pirate Bay team has already asked other BitTorrent admins to stand up against the IFPI lobby, and arranged a meeting with Tele2 to discuss the current events. Pirate Bay co-founder Brokep told TorrentFreak in a response: "I hope the torrent community understands what this will do to Danish people. It will also act as a very bad precedent for the European Union, and I hope everybody will fight this." At the moment, The Pirate Bay team is registering new (Danish) domains, to make sure people can still download .torrent files from the Bay when the ban is activated later today tomorrow. In addition the Pirate Bay will launch a campaign website, together with the Danish pro-piracy lobby "Piratgruppen".
After a long procrastination in fighting out whatever issue broke the info exchange slash code site, and an even longer process of converting that slash code site to drupal, we're just about done. At this point, all stories, users, comments have been moved over. slash user's journal entries are now blog posts. Thanks to those that attended the workshop at NYC Drupal Camp 3 for which conversion from slash to drupal was started. Details on the conversion can be found at http://eric.openflows.com/node/26 Expect the site to change a bit in design, interface and features over the next month or two.

Behind the fire: Ben Dangl on struggles in Latin America

Shay Totten

From the Vermont Guardian


Vermont Guardian: In the research for your book, The Price of Fire: Resource Wars and Social Movements in Bolivia, what did you find to be the biggest misconception that people in the United States have about the struggles facing many of the indigenous people in Latin and South America?

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